This Week Health

G.P. Singh stops by to discuss the state of interoperability in healthcare.

Transcript
Bill Russell:

Today in health, it interviews from the chime

Bill Russell:

conference in San Diego.

Bill Russell:

My name is bill Russell.

Bill Russell:

I'm a former CIO for a 16 hospital system and creator of this week in health.

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It a channel dedicated to keeping health it staff current and engaged.

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Just a quick reminder.

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I wouldn't be dropping interviews over the next couple of days and into

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next week from the chime conference.

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And then I'm going to have some more interviews from the next conference I

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want to be going to, and then eventually I'll get back to Florida and to the studio

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where we'll start looking at the news.

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Once again.

Bill Russell:

Hope you enjoy this interview.

Bill Russell:

All right.

Bill Russell:

Another interview from the chime floor.

Bill Russell:

We're here with GPC with LK.

Bill Russell:

Hi, how are you?

Bill Russell:

Good.

Bill Russell:

I'm looking forward to the conversation.

Bill Russell:

So thank you for having me.

Bill Russell:

I would normally ask what's top of mind, but top of mind

Bill Russell:

for you is interoperability.

Bill Russell:

I

GP Singh:

interrupted, but it is the big thing that everybody's spending Solomon.

GP Singh:

Yeah, that'd be at the

Bill Russell:

top of my mind.

Bill Russell:

So what kind of conversations in what aspect are they looking at?

Bill Russell:

Interoperability?

Bill Russell:

Is it, is it broadly to share information with, with other health systems?

Bill Russell:

Is it sharing it with consumers?

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Is it RJ?

Bill Russell:

Just all of it.

GP Singh:

It's, you know, what's, what's been really interesting is that, uh,

GP Singh:

you know, the healthcare systems have really evolved around having shared data.

GP Singh:

So it isn't just between systems.

GP Singh:

It's now with a lot of the digital health systems that are out there, there's a lot

GP Singh:

of the digital front door applications.

GP Singh:

Patient engagement applications out there.

GP Singh:

Um, so digital health has really taken off in a big way in the last couple of years

GP Singh:

with COVID obviously in addition to that there's pop health platforms, there's life

GP Singh:

sciences, there's, uh, you know, working with all of the networks out there.

GP Singh:

So there's a lot that happens in the hospital or healthcare

GP Singh:

system around exchange of data.

GP Singh:

And so interoperability really plays

Bill Russell:

a key role.

Bill Russell:

What about, uh, so 21st century cures, is that spurred that on a little bit or.

Bill Russell:

Naturally happening as a result of our digital transformation,

GP Singh:

that's been part of the deal with the 21st century cures act as there's

GP Singh:

been a lot of emphasis on, on being able to allow for easy exchange of data.

GP Singh:

Uh, but also COVID Israeli, um, made that even more imperative

GP Singh:

because telehealth was almost like people were kind of working.

GP Singh:

It wasn't obvious that there was going to be a lot of folks using it, but

GP Singh:

COVID has really changed that around.

GP Singh:

It's gained a lot of acceptance and Vitale help, you know, a lot

GP Singh:

of the digital health applications that have really gained acceptance.

GP Singh:

So, uh, a lot of those factors out there, so

Bill Russell:

LK is pretty much agnostic, right?

Bill Russell:

You're not like pushing a single tool or, or solution at this

GP Singh:

point, you know, elk is, has been in business for about what 20 years.

GP Singh:

Uh, you know, we've built the platform.

GP Singh:

Time, uh, we're known as a healthcare data plumbers, uh, for a reason

GP Singh:

because we understand healthcare data plumbing better than I think better

GP Singh:

than a lot of other folks out there.

GP Singh:

So, uh, we have a platform that's been built to enable, uh, data exchange

GP Singh:

across, uh, different entities, different types of applications.

GP Singh:

And we have our own interface engine that really has been

GP Singh:

developed within the organization.

GP Singh:

When you think about it, nine of the 10 labs in the country, work with us,

GP Singh:

we're pretty big in the lab space.

GP Singh:

We're pretty big into data, archiving data migration space.

GP Singh:

We're pretty big in the ambulatory space, right.

GP Singh:

And then of course, in the interoperability space, and now all

GP Singh:

of a sudden, the bare space, we're making some headway over there.

GP Singh:

So across a lot of segments in that sense.

GP Singh:

So I'm going to give

Bill Russell:

you my use case and I'd love to just bat it around.

Bill Russell:

Uh, Southern California, we weren't able to employ the docs.

Bill Russell:

So we had a foundation model.

Bill Russell:

We ended up with a hundred different instances of the EHR.

Bill Russell:

It's not like we could have said, Hey, we're all going to a single EHR.

Bill Russell:

That'll solve the issue that was not even on the table.

Bill Russell:

Right.

Bill Russell:

So we had to figure out how to build a first, the clinically integrated network.

Bill Russell:

And so with the clinically integrated network, you have to have the metrics

Bill Russell:

that you're going to be providing back to those, to those physicians,

Bill Russell:

to, you know, make value, create value from that, from that network.

Bill Russell:

So there was a lot of disparate systems.

Bill Russell:

We had to bring all that data together.

Bill Russell:

We had to put it into a, you know, some sort of, of, of data analytics engine.

Bill Russell:

And then we had to produce things and get it back into the workflow so

Bill Russell:

that they could, could utilize it.

Bill Russell:

Is that, so I was trying to solve that in 20 12, 20 13.

Bill Russell:

Have we solved that or

GP Singh:

is that still so, so we've solved that to a large extent.

GP Singh:

Um, you know, we've got something known as a clinical data.

GP Singh:

Where we bring in data from disparate systems in a community health

GP Singh:

systems out of Indiana uses us.

GP Singh:

For example, you know, where, you know, when a patient walks into an epic

GP Singh:

instance, right, or into a hospital and they're primary care setting on all

GP Singh:

kinds of different systems out there, we're able to bring that data into

GP Singh:

our CDX platform, make that available through epic or through Cerner or

GP Singh:

whatever system they might be out there.

GP Singh:

So that you'll get the holistic view of what the patients, you know, uh, record.

GP Singh:

And then that same platform then becomes helpful to be able to feed a

GP Singh:

lot of the analytics and the quality platforms and be able to feed that.

GP Singh:

So the pop health vendors use us for that.

GP Singh:

Uh, a lot of the, uh, folks that are around aggregating data for

GP Singh:

life sciences, trials and clinical trials users for that, because, you

GP Singh:

know, we clearly have demonstrated the ability to bring all of that.

GP Singh:

And create that sort of a consolidated view of that data.

GP Singh:

So we are doing that right now across, so a lot of customers, the

Bill Russell:

mature, and, and I'm not throwing this out as a buzzword,

Bill Russell:

that's going to solve the world.

Bill Russell:

I understand its limitations, but what's the maturity level

Bill Russell:

of, of, of fire right now.

GP Singh:

You know, um, fire has been on fire for awhile,

GP Singh:

again, kind of using the Domo.

GP Singh:

There's still a lot of work that needs to be done.

GP Singh:

Uh, just as an example, you know, a lot of the EMR companies have

GP Singh:

enabled fire to access data out of the EMR, but still not enabled to

GP Singh:

be able to write back into the EMR.

GP Singh:

So there's, there's still a lot of work that needs to be done

GP Singh:

around that, but it's definitely moving in the right direction.

GP Singh:

And I think in the next few years, we are going to see some more levels of maturity,

GP Singh:

but I wouldn't call it fully mature, but, um, you know, it's kind of getting there,

Bill Russell:

right.

Bill Russell:

Writing data back into the.

Bill Russell:

Has has always been one of those things that we are very cautious of because

Bill Russell:

you're, you're, it's, it's the system of record around the patients, right.

Bill Russell:

Health and those kinds of things.

Bill Russell:

Plus we don't want to, we don't want to clog it up.

Bill Russell:

So even though we can connect to all these really cool devices and pull that data

Bill Russell:

in, uh, the personal devices and whatnot, we're, we're still reluctant to bring

Bill Russell:

that data in as are we, are we starting to figure out ways to, to incorporate that.

GP Singh:

Yeah.

GP Singh:

So, so what you're saying is, right, right.

GP Singh:

I mean, there's so much data that ultimately is that data even going to

GP Singh:

get used by anybody that is in somebody even going to look at it with everything

GP Singh:

is just kind of put back into the EMR.

GP Singh:

There's gotta be a certain process and a certain, uh, way to kind of, you know,

GP Singh:

bring that data in maybe, you know, insights from that data is probably

GP Singh:

more helpful than just your raw data.

GP Singh:

Right.

GP Singh:

And maybe bringing those insights into the EMR might be a better way

GP Singh:

to, to kind of really have actually.

GP Singh:

Uh, you know, goals that are so instead

Bill Russell:

of moving my, every time I step on the scale and to the EHR,

Bill Russell:

you're essentially letting the doctor know this information sits outside

Bill Russell:

of there, but there's intellects being run against it that says,

Bill Russell:

Hey, Bill's put on 10 pounds since

GP Singh:

COVID started.

GP Singh:

Exactly.

GP Singh:

I think something along those lines might be a better approach, although,

GP Singh:

you know, right now, when you think about it, right, this patient intake systems,

GP Singh:

patient intake systems are getting data from Pittsburgh data sources from the.

GP Singh:

And really taking a lot of information in front of help and move that into sort of

GP Singh:

a pre, uh, encounter sort of data, right.

GP Singh:

That data model works.

GP Singh:

Right?

GP Singh:

So those situations were, but then the RPN space where there's

GP Singh:

remote patient monitoring, that's happening, we're working with a lot

GP Singh:

of remote patient monitoring vendors.

GP Singh:

Uh, what we're seeing over there is the companies that have sending insights

GP Singh:

are actionable insights are probably have a better chance of engagement

GP Singh:

with the providers rather than.

GP Singh:

Plain and simple take all the data and throw it into the EMR, which really

GP Singh:

doesn't generate the same sort of that.

Bill Russell:

I love the, uh, data plumbers.

Bill Russell:

I don't know if you're trying to go away from it or whatnot.

Bill Russell:

Cause I know some people struggle with that, but that is Indic that's

Bill Russell:

essentially what you're trying to do is you're, you know, we look out

Bill Russell:

in the city of San Diego, right?

Bill Russell:

We don't see the plumbing.

Bill Russell:

We don't see all the things, but if it wasn't there so many things.

GP Singh:

Which is exactly what LK is about.

GP Singh:

There are so many places there they don't know LK is because they fully provide the

GP Singh:

plumbing, uh, you know, uh, for, for a lot of these organizations and health systems,

GP Singh:

but that's what we're really good at.

GP Singh:

And, uh, you know, we want to continue doing that and I don't think we're

GP Singh:

going to move away from plumbing.

GP Singh:

Plumbing is going to be our core business versus Chiefy.

GP Singh:

Thank you for your time.

GP Singh:

Thanks a lot.

GP Singh:

Appreciate it, bill.

Bill Russell:

Don't forget to check back as we have more of these interviews

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